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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 412 (some duplicates have been removed)
10/11/12 10/11/12 [captioning made possible by democracy now!] >> from los alamos, new mexico, this is "democracy now!" [explosion] >> the familiar mushroom cloud hurling the deadly radiation to the heavens. >> in the special broadcast from just outside los alamos national laboratory, we look at the radioactive legacy of new mexico. the atomic bomb used in world war ii were designed and developed here. new mexico still plays a key role in maintaining the nation's massive nuclear arsenal. >> it is revitalizing its nuclear weapons production base, and again, the laboratories -- mark my words -- as the republicans already wrote, they are calling for or attempting to demand a "modern or had" that means a new designs. >> we will speak with jay coghlan of nuclear watch new mexico. and los alamos whistleblower chuck montaÑo. devastationt the uranium mining has had with leona morgan from navajo dinÉ against uranium mining. and michael reynolds on how he is quitting radically sustainable living operations through worship biotecture. >> the soldiers and all of the armies and all of th
and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public encounters with venezuela's hugo chavez, with former cuban dictator fidel castro. the president of bolivia stood up after only six minutes of questioning by him. both ramos and celines both moderated the first bilingual presidential debate. and most recently with the meet the candidates forum. but perhaps they are best known for defending the rights of immigrants by reporting on their plight and giving a voice
and menaced the french troops in mexico under the emperor, maximilian. maximilian had come to power in mexico during the civil war and he has supported the confederacy former rebel troops streaming into mexico, seeking refuge. the state department opposed any actions towards mexico. so sheridan today clandestine cold war, arguably the first in u.s. history. he conducted conspicuous troop maneuvers near the rio grande river and the secretly provided mexican insurgents with weapons from the federal arsenal. partly due to sheridan zephyrs, but also events in europe, the emperor, napoleon the third cam withdrew his support of maximilian. maximilian's regime collapsed and the mexican insurgents that sheridan has ordered took control of their country. sheridan was a military governor of texas and louisiana during the early phases of reconstruction. the army commanders in the south were caught between congresses harsh reconstruction policies and president andrew johnson's opposition to them. most of them kept a low profile. sheridan did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed the light at officials
? in mexico, the debate is raging on whether to ban bullfighting. >> it is still one of the most controversial past times in the americas. bullfighting has been practiced in mexico since the time of the conquistadores, but its days might now be numbered. last year, a proposed ban in the mexican capital only felt at the final hurdle. this time around, the activists are convinced that the legislation will pass. following a partial ban in countries like peru and ecuador, this, the largest bullring in the world in mexico as potential the next site to be closed down. that is something that these fans and the workers here are desperate to avoid. this has been in the hernandez family for five generations. as they run their eye over a possible praetors, they look for speed, strength, and the instinct to charge. the men are very aware that their livelihood is at stake. >> we take care of these animals, is better than we take care of ourselves. there are economic and cultural questions at stake. bullfighting has existed in mexico for more than 500 years. it strikes me as irrational that as a single stro
between us." in the book she shares her experience of going up in mexico without her parents who immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you
civilizations. in colorado and new mexico, native americans built thriving towns. in the rain forests of mesoamerica, the ancient maya created magnificent city-states. here three million people once lived. in the earliest cradle of civilization, ancient mesopotamian farmers once made these deserts bloom. halfway around the world, in california, are clues to understanding the fall of mesopotamia, as farmers here struggle to overcome a threat to this fertile garden land. the ruins of ancient societies may hold keys to our own survival as, out of the past, archaeologists explore one of the greatest of mysteries -- the decline and fall of grand civilizations. mission control: ignition... and liftoff. liftoff... keach: for more than five millennia, humankind has seemed to dominate earth, both creating and destroying grand civilizations. each of these human experiments has changed our planet. this high vantage point brings us a new and sobering view. for the first time, we behold our world as finite, limited. on the darkened face of earth, the lights of cities record the expansion of our ki
talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years later. savanna that came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. poster wanted to come to the unit
you to know that my priorities are mexico's priorities. protecting social security and medicare. tax cuts for the middle class, keeping our promises to our veterans and making college more affordable for everyone. i come home nearly every weekend so i can hold the job fairs to meet with the mexicans and raise my family. i've always fought for the things that matter most to the mexicans and i will continue to do that in the senate. >> moderator: was the first question with the deficit increasing by the second economic recovery, what would you as a u.s. senator do about taxes and what would you do about spending? we will begin with martin. i think what is critical was to take a balanced approach. every single bipartisan group that's gotten together butter it is simpson-bowles. if you look at both sides of the equation and increase revenue and make cuts to existing programs we are going to have to weather some challenging kids in the future because spending is too high but we also have to increase revenues. it's fair to ask people what the upper income levels to shoulder the same respon
of the primordial forest and sunk its roots into the soil. today, we know the region by its countries-- mexico, honduras, el salvador, belize, and guatemala. but long ago, it was the world of the maya. not an empire, nor a country, the classic maya culture flourished from the third to the ninth century in a far flung collection of city-states. at palenque, tonina, bonampak and other cities, dynastic kings ruled absolutely, controlling trade and tribute. they presided over intricate hierarchies of nobles and officials at courts resplendent with works of art. maya culture, shrouded in a mystery as dense as the forests in which it took root, revealed itself fitfully over three centuries. when the ruins in the jungle were first discovered, there was no way of understanding how the civilization was organized. so it's really through the inscriptions that we've been able to identify kings, to find out their capitals, their seats of power. and through this, we recognize now that there were many kingdoms. there was no unified maya state. there wasn't even just a few states. there were many, many states
. the homeless world cup has just ended in mexico. first, let's look at some other stories making the headlines. trial hearings have begun into the disaster. it is the first time the captain based survivors. 32 people died in january. >> scotland it now has the right to hold the referendum on independence from the uk. in the scottish capital, the simple yes or no vote on staying in the u.k. is set to take place in the fall of 2014. >> the girl shot by the taller than -- by the taliban has arrived at the hospital. militants attacked the 14-year- old for campaigning for education. she was shot in the head and neck. >> the philippines a signed a peace pact. this could end an uprising. we will see the creation of a new muslim and the south. >> as they prepare for the 2014 soccer world cup, another championship has been held in mexico city. >> the world a homeless soccer cup is staged to call attention to the plight of those without a roof over their heads. >> these people were celebrating with a normally would be unwelcome. nearly 500 homeless men and women around the world squared off on mexico ci
attacker. >> mr. speaker, i'm not an anti-immigrant. my father was born in mexico. my wife's father was born in wales. they came to this country. the idea that i'm anti-immigrant is repulsive. >> reporter: and diane, take a look at this picture that the obama campaign sent out. it is from four years ago, in oxford, mississippi, then senator obama preparing for his first presidential debate against john mccain. both candidates right now, mitt romney and barack obama, no doubt, very nervous. i'm nervous, just looking at that picture. diane? >> okay, jake. i will see you tonight for the big event. and i want to bring in co-anchor of "good morning america" and anchor of "this week," my co-anchor tonight, george stephanopoulos. such a night after this long road. what are these two men thinking right now? >> reporter: probably exactly the same thing. tonight, don't take the other guy's bait. play your game. but there is more pressure on mitt romney tonight. you look at the polls right now, he is behind nationally, probably behind even more in the battlegrounds. he needs a circuit breaker
this narrative of your brother, 1, your fabulous aunt character in mexico getting frosty into mexico and running around with frita caller and your discovery of apples? >> this is astonishing, are we talking about the family past apple? >> both and the way thing danagers come together, yeah. >> kind of astonishing, again working on the idea that everything is passed down in families is it or is it not or is it coincidence. my father had a difficult relationship with his father from mexico. we knew our family had this chain of nurseries from mexico. i never understood because my father would change tg subject when his name came up. our grandfather was an orchardist at the turn of the century. >> which you hadn't even known. >> i didn't know it until i discovered this at the archive when i was trying to page through all of these things. then i discovered an obituary that had been written about our grandfather when he died when we were much to young to remember him. it was very, very long in the texas at the time. it detailed every, all the rare plants, specimen plants, horticultural, introducing th
were you born? >> guest: in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that no one heard of, but when i mention alcapaco, everybody knows that. it was three hours from there. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came here in 1997 when i was two years old, and he send for my mother a few years later in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 198 # 5. >> host: how old were you? >> guest: in may of 1985, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your trek? >> guest: well, i had been separated from my father for eight years so when he returned to mexico in 1985, we convinced him to bring us back here. he was not coming back to mexico, and we didn't want anymore time separated from him. my father didn't want to bring me because i was nine and a half, and he thought i couldn't make it across the border because we had to run across illegally. i begged him to bring me here, and we too
is election day. thank you for watching. so long. >> the debate between the candidate for senate and mexico. martin heinrich and heather wilson. this debate is hosted by the sun time and kfox tv. our coverage begins after the opening statements. it is about an hour. they represent more than 60 years of journalism experience. we have a lot of experience on that side of the table. walt is going to start with the first question. >> heather wilson wrote the affordable care act is unconstitutional because of the individual mandate. if not thrown out by the supreme court, it to be repealed or replace. martin heinrich voted for the bill. what should the replacement be? if it is to be kept, what changes should be made? >> i think it is that -- important to understand why it should be repealed and replaced. it was a mistake. it is already costing jobs in the state of new mexico. it is not just jobs. it takes $700 billion out of medicare. there is only one candidate for the united states senate tonight to has voted to cut medicare. i also believe that and increases the cost of health care. we are see
of utah, we thank you both for running. >>> the new mexico senate race where heinrich and wilson debated for the last time. this comes from new mexico. >> moderator: i'm tom, and welcome to the u.s. senate debate. our sponsor is aarp, glad you're with us. this debate is sigh mull cast on 770kklb am, and joining us on the stage, there's democratic candidate martin, and republican candidate heather wilson vying to replace jeff bingaman who is retiring. each candidate has a minute for an open statement, and later, a minute for closing statements. the candidates have one minute to answer each question and then 45 seconds each for rebuttals. later, candidates can ask the other candidate is question, often very enjoyable. the answers will be limited to one minute, and each will have 45 seconds for rebuttal. martin won the coin toss, select to go second with his opening statement, so heather wilson, please go ahead with your companies statement. wilson: thank you, tom, for hosting this. we have two kids at home, one about ready for college, and the other who is the queen of her universe in high
funding for this program was provided by... at vacation retreats in ancient mexico, aztec kings bathe while their armies sack and burn a remote town. thousands of captives are marched to the capital where their hearts are offered to gods who sanctioned conquest. every city and town in the empire pays tribute in exact amount and kind as specified by the aztecs, or risks horrible consequences. in the forests and jungles of other realms, maya kings rule great cities with the force of their own personalities. they build temples and huge stone billboards to prop up royal dynasties that have little actual power. they perform gruesome rituals that require the skins of other people. they go to war and capture players for their ball games -- games where the losers never play again. today, inside ancient pyramids, archaeologists face real danger to bring the story of these kings and their politics out of the past. before the arrival of europeans, two extraordinary civilizations flourished in mesoamerica. both the aztecs and the maya had cultures of startling sophistication, and political
cruzar la frontera hacia mexico donde un galon cuesta alrededor de tres dolares con treinta y tres centavos... cesar ---el comite de seguridad publica del concejo municipal de oakland esta considerando colocar mas camaras de trafico en diferentes interseccione s de la ciudad para que capten a conductores que no respeten la luz roja del semaforo... take vo ---actualmente hay trece camaras en once intersecciones, pero las autoridades quieren que esta cifra se eleve a treinta... ---si la ciudad adquiere mas camaras deberan gastar unos 2,2 millones de dolares... ---otras ciudades de la bahia han desistido de la colocacion de estos intrumentos por considerarlos ineficientes... ---a nivel estatal se detuvo la emision de multas generadas por esas camaras. blanca ---el oficial de la policia de oakland que dio muerte a alan blueford de 18 aÑos durante una persecucion a pie, actuo en defensa propia y no enfrentara cargos criminales. take vo ---asi lo informo el fiscal del condado de alameda... ---la fiscalia determino que el tiroteo del 6 de mayo se dio, luego que "blueford" amenaz al ofici
aseguran que su pronostico es grave. ---su esposa, quien vive en mexico, esta solicitando un permiso para viajar a estados unidos. ---la pareja tiene 4 hijos y segun sus allegados, chuc planeaba regresar a mexico con su familia antes de navidad. ---si usted tiene informacion sobre este caso, contacte a las autoridades. blanca --buenas noches les saluda blanca garza gracias por acompaÑarnos . cu ---hoy.. un grupo de estudiantes en oakland vivio momentos de tension y angustia cuando un hombre armado rondaba las instalaciones de una universidad. take 2 box ---gabriela dellan en vivo desde la sala de redaccion, nos tiene mas detalles del suceso. gaby --en efecto blanca... todo comenzo en horas de la maÑana cuando varios testigos reportaron haber visto al sospechoso.... -- esta noche la institucion abrio nuevamente despues de permanecer cerrada varias horas ,,, pero los estudiantes dicen temer que el sujeto regrese.. 0:03 0:26 0:47 take pkg sot: "27:08 we got an email saying someone in the campus with a gun 29:14 -- el dia de dallas comenzo con terror .. al recibir un correo donde le ordenab
on the southern border with mexico. do you still feel that this is the way to go? >> people said we cannot build a wall. i said, i would get down to the tinker toys and show them. i put together a model and said, this is how we do it. we could build a mile of this per day. this puts aside the argument, that we have 5,500 miles of the great wall of china, but my position is that we do not need 200,000 miles of wall, we just do that until they start going around the end. >> is this a concrete barrier? or a brief explanation? >> when the president ridiculed the wall, he was 600 feet from the fences and the walls and the most down along the border. i would describe this as a kind of concrete system with the foundational trench, and the concrete panels, and if you build the wall up you have to have routes on either side, with the chain-link fence by the border. we are spending $12 billion -- $6 billion per mile. >> talking about immigration is what we're talking about. president obama -- if you join congress which be supportive of this trend continuing? >> the most important thing is to secure the bo
you make reference to the u.s. and mexico and house do you view the effected of things such as transnational criminal organizations and confluence of radical extremists, the movement of iran into venezuela and the fact the we have a large border that is essentially flat. >> in my book talking about mexico because i believe anomaly is shining and the greater middle east crucial to the u.s. destiny but mexico is on the same level and on the same level of importance because latin history is moving north demographically. the average guatemalans is 20. the average mexican is in late 20s. the average american -- much longer populations growing at faster rates and ours and whatever we do with immigration there will be more latin speaking people in our society. donald flynn be wrote in the early part of the 20th century when you have an artificial border where much of the southern border is between a highly developed society and and economically less developed society the border doesn't stay stable but moves in the direction of the less developed society which ultimately finds
with the president of mexico. felipe calderon. >> you need to have the principals that know one nation couldn't prosper without rule of law. because that is ectly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in mexico. we want a country in which the law prevails. otherwise it will be impossible to prosper or to have a fair society. >> rose: we continue talking about google ventures with kevin rose and bill maris. >> we're investing in teams and people more than products at the early stages. so you're looking for larry and certificate guy as they were starting out they are what made google different from lycos and the other search engines. >> rose: we con chrood with the photography of brigitte lacombe. >> she asked would we be interested in doing something similar for london olympic on women in sport. and of course, i mean, it was just like a great opportunity because i mean for me andlso for my sister to discover the new world, i know nothing about sports. and it was very intriguing. >> rose: yes. >> and so of course we sa
an hour. now, it's $2.50 an hour, a lot closer to mexico's average wage of $3.50 an hour, according to flextronics international, an electronics- maker with countries. now, some say china is preparing to change its manufacturing model. "they're going to put more in r&d and robotic." wages in china are rising so quickly that the boston consulting group estimates labor costs for manufacturing in china and the u.s. could converge as early as 2015. think of it - a billion consumers with more money to spend. "you want people to have money to buy your product." but there's a catch - china wants to promote chinese-made goods. "chinese always try to encourage buying goods made in china. it helps unemployment and is a source of national pride." for products aimed at american consumers, the real winner in china's rising wages may be mexico - a lot closer to the u.s., which means faster and cheaper. another benefit to the u.s. if mexico's export economy is stronger - american companies earn 37 cents of every dollar exported from mexico. why? mexican companies rely that much on american-made pa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 412 (some duplicates have been removed)